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CIRTL Reads: A Journal Club on STEM Teaching

 

    Join scholarly discussions of recent peer-reviewed research on innovation in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) teaching. Discussions are held monthly via webconference between students, postdocs, faculty, and staff from the 43 CIRTL Network universities. Feel free to attend only the sessions that interest you - but please read the article before attending! Headsets or microphones are recommended for these Blackboard Collaborate sessions - contact cu-cirtl@cornell.edu to borrow equipment.

    • Schedule: Mondays, 2:00-3:00 pm ET

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    Past Sessions

    Developing Learning Communities for STEM Students

    • Monday, April 10, 2017 from 2:00-3:00 pm
    • Article: Baiduc, Rachael R., Linsenmeier, Robert A., and Nancy Ruggeri. 2016. Mentored Discussions of Teaching: An Introductory Teaching Development Program for Future STEM Faculty Innovative Higher Education. 41(3):237–254.
    • Discussants: Adam Blanford, TIGER Coordinator, Graduate Teacher Program, University of Colorado Boulder; Dr. Robert Linsenmeier, Professor of Biomedical Engineering and Neurobiology & Physiology, Northwestern University; Dr. Nancy Ruggeri, Director, Graduate and Postdoctoral Programs, Northwestern University; and Dr. Rachael R. Baiduc, Assistant Professor of Speech, Language, and Hearing Sciences, University of Colorado-Boulder
    • Description: CIRTL institutional leaders Robert Linsenmeier and Nancy Ruggeri will join us to discuss their recent 2016 article describing Northwestern University’s “Mentored Discussions of Teaching” (MDT) program.

     

    Problem-Based Learning in STEM Courses

    • Monday, March 13, 2017 from 2:00-3:00 pm
    • Article: Allen, Deborah E., Duch, Barbara J., and Susan E. Groh. 1996. The Power of Problem-Based Learning in Teaching Introductory Science Courses. New Directions for Teaching and Learning. 68:43–52.
    • Discussants: Adam Blanford, TIGER Coordinator, Graduate Teacher Program, University of Colorado Boulder, and Dr. Deborah Allen, Professor of Biological Sciences and CIRTL Faculty Director, University of Delaware
    • Description: We’ll discuss problem-based learning (PBL) as an alternative to the traditional lecture-based classroom format with Deborah Allen,  co-author of this month's article. 

     

    The Long Road: Keeping STEM Students Moving on the Path to Success

    • Monday, February 13, 2017 from 2:00-3:00 pm
    • Articles:
      • ​Flores, Benjamin and Connie Kubo Della Piana. 2000. Undergraduate Student Retention Strategies for Urban Engineering Colleges. ASEE/ISEE Frontiers in Education Conference Paper, Oct. 18–21, 2000. F1F-7–F1F-10.
      • Bevcar, James E., Dreyfuss, A.E., Flores, Benjamin C., and Walter E. Dickson. 2008. ‘Plus Two’ Peer-Led Team Learning Improves Student Success, Retention, and Timely Graduation. ASEE/ISEE Frontiers in Education Conference Paper, Oct. 22–25, 2008. T4D-15–T4D-18.
    • Discussants: Adam Blanford, TIGER Coordinator, Graduate Teacher Program, University of Colorado Boulder, and Dr. Benjamin Flores, Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering and CIRTL Director, University of Texas-El Paso
    • Description: We’ll discuss persistence and retention in engineering with Benjamin Flores, co-author of this month's articles.

     

    Designing for All: Inclusive Excellence and Universal Design

    • Monday, December 12, 2016 from 2:00-3:00 pm
    • Article: Rose, David H., Harbour, Wendy S., Johnson, Catherine Sam, Daley, Samantha G., and Linda Arbarbanell. 2006. Universal Design for Learning in Postsecondary Education: Reflections on Principles and their Application. Journal of Postsecondary Education and Disability. 19(2): 135–151.
    • Discussant: Adam Blanford, TIGER Coordinator, Graduate Teacher Program, University of Colorado Boulder
    • Description: We’ll look at the principles of inclusive excellence and universal design via an article from Harvard University’s teaching center.

     

    Achieving Equity in STEM

    • Monday, November 14, 2016 from 2:00-3:00 pm
    • Article: Brewe, Eric, Sawtelle, Vashti, Kramer, Laird H., O’Brien, George, Rodriguez, Idaykis, and Priscilla Pamela. 2010. Toward equity through participation in Modeling Instruction in introductory university physics. Physical Review Special Topics – Physics Education Research 6:010106-1–010106-12.
    • Discussants: Adam Blanford, TIGER Coordinator, Graduate Teacher Program, University of Colorado Boulder, and Dr. Laird Kramer, Associate Professor of Physics, Florida International University
    • Description: We’ll look at how to achieve equity in STEM courses by discussing the use of Modeling Instruction (MI) in introductory physics courses. 

     

    Science Explains, Writing Describes: Teaching STEM Undergraduates to Write

    • Monday, September 12, 2016 from 2:00-3:00 pm
    • Articles: 
      • Libarkin, Julie and Gabriel Ording. 2012. The Utility of Writing Assignments in Undergraduate Bioscience. CBE – Life Sciences Education 11(1):39–46, Spring 2012.
      • Reynolds, Julie, Thaiss, Christopher, Katakin, Wendy, and Robert J. Thompson. 2012. Writing-to-Learn in Undergraduate Science Education: A Community-Based, Conceptually Driven Approach. CBE – Life Sciences Education 11(1):17–25, Spring 2012.
    • Discussant: Adam Blanford, TIGER Coordinator, Graduate Teacher Program, University of Colorado Boulder
    • Description: We will look at the utility of writing assignments and different contexts in which they may be used.
     

    How Do We Approach Evidence-Based Education?

    • Monday, October 10, 2016 from 2:00-3:00 pm
    • Article: Davies, Philip. 1999. What is Evidence-Based Education? British Journal of Educational Studies. 47(2):108–121.
    • Discussants:  Adam Blanford, TIGER Coordinator, Graduate Teacher Program, University of Colorado Boulder, and Dr. Preston Cumming, Lead Coordinator, Graduate Teacher Program, Colorado University Boulder
    • Description: We’re going to discuss the article's arguments in light of the last fifteen-plus years of educational research and whether evidence-based educational instruction is viewed by current researchers as a “panacea” or “structured set of principles” leading to a promising future.